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Archive for April, 2011

Woman of Valor Rosebud – Proverbs 31: 10-31

April 29th, 2011 by Admin | No Comments | Filed in Inspirational Stuff

The Woman of Valor Rosebud – Red is art that celebrates the special women in our lives. Each and every stroke that creates the image is created with a letter from the original Hebrew text of Proverbs 31: 10-31.

A red rose is a meaningful universal symbol for love. They also stand for respect and courage. Red rosebuds mean pure and lovely. These understandings of feminine virtue are found in Proverbs 31:10-31, which is also known as the Bible’s Woman of Valor.

Traditionally Jewish men read this scripture passage to their wives of the Sabbath as a tribute. It is also a custom to bring flowers to the wife or any home that one visits for the Friday evening meal. This ancient custom continues to this day.

Rosebuds symbolize beauty, youth and an innocent heart.

A single rose stands for simplicity.

:The wilderness and the solitary place shall be glad for them; and the desert shall rejoice, and blossom as the rose.” –Isaiah 35:1

Woman of Valor- Proverbs 31 Rose

Woman of Valor Rosebud – Red

By Judy Rey Wasserman

There is nothing more difficult for a truly creative painter than to paint a rose, because before he can do so he has first to forget all the roses that were ever painted. — Henri Matisse

Below is a close up of a detail of the artwork so that you can see that each and every letter, which may overlap and be placed this way and that, is always an original Torah font letter of the scripture text of Woman of Valor.

A fine art archival print of this unique Post Conceptual and UnGraven Image artwork is makes a special gift for a beloved woman, including wives, mothers, girlfriends, sisters, daughters, grandmothers, teachers, and best friends. This is also a beautiful gift for the bar mitzvah girl, sweet sixteen, bride to be, expectant mother and bridesmaids.

Unlike a bouquet of live flowers or fruit, this is art she can cherish throughout her lifetime.

To see more and discover how you can purchase a print of this work, SEE:http://store.artofseeingthedivine.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=2&products_id=19<br>

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The Divine Transformation – Blessings of Passover & Easter

April 18th, 2011 by Admin | 1 Comment | Filed in Inspirational Stuff

The spring festivals of Passover and Easter are about the transformation that occurs when one completely follows The Divine*, which for monotheistic Christians and Jews is the One God.

There is a rebirth that occurs not by the decision – but by the actualization or enactment of that decision. The decision is easy, but carrying it out is almost always fraught with difficulties.

The adversities can be understood as tests in which one proves ones determination, probably more to oneself that to the Divine. Persistence and endurance will overcome any of the adversities; they will also bring a miraculous new life.

Our adversities and troubles can often be understood as blessings in disguise as they often inspire us to redouble our efforts and focus on The Divine through prayer, meditation and study. It has been said that, “There are no atheists in foxholes.”

Often, when in good times we celebrate, even pat ourselves on the back for our victories and focus less on The Divine*. We grow closer to The Divine, and thus become more of our true selves when we are desperate for help. We learn to focus on The Divine through prayer, meditation and study, because we really need help and may have nowhere else to turn for relief. As Aristotle said, “We learn by doing.”

Cherry Tree
by Judy Rey Wasserman

Strokes are Psalm 46

See this image larger and discover how you can own the  Fine Art Print

Embarking on the journey of following The Divine means leaving behind anything, and even anyone, that is not a part of the journey. Whatever we must leave behind is always something that is only necessary to support our ego or our false pride and diverts us from being our true selves. What and who we surround ourselves with helps us keep or lose our purpose and chosen vision.

In Exodus we learn that although the Israelis were not affected by the twelve plagues, they were subject to the wrath of those around them, which considering they were slaves must have been horrible. Yet, Moses persisted and returned again and again to Pharaoh asking that his people be allowed to leave Israel .

Finally, the Israelis were allowed to leave Egypt but they had to hurry! The Israelis needed to surround themselves with visions of a new life of riches and splendor, not the old life of poverty and slavery, both physically and metaphorically as shown by the Bible’s description of the Egyptians giving them precious gold and jewels.

The Bible does dwell on the obvious: what they had to leave behind, such as their homes, which were meager havens but filled with precious memories, including the wonderful recent meal they had shared on the night the Egyptians lost their first born sons. It was a hard life, but it was what they knew and had, but now they had to embark on the unknown.

Strokes are Deuteronomy 6

Spring Tree
by Judy Rey Wasserman

See this artwork larger and Discover how you can own it as an investment quality limited edition Fine Art Print print

Transformation always involves willingly entering the unknown and wandering around in it for a period of time. Birth itself represents transformation when we leave the known security of the womb and wander through the birth canal until we become a new viable human being who can breathe freely.In Genesis, The Divine blows His breath into Adam, which makes him alive. Every other living thing is spoken into life but Man, who is formed and then given the breath of The Divine. Thus according to Genesis, our breath shows that we live and metaphorically indicates The Divine in us.

The minute the Israelites left Egypt they were breathing as free people. Their behaviors and activities were no longer slaves who were subjected to the will of others. Experiencing their new freedom they immediately lacked ego, which in scripture is represented by yeast, which puffs up bread and is a metaphor for false pride and willful behavior. Thus initially during their journey in freedom, they ate matzoh as they turned fully to The Divine.

According to Thomas’ account the transformed and risen Jesus spoke to him. The act of speaking proves a person is alive as no one can speak without breath.

For both Jews and Christians and everyone else spring brings a new vision. We celebrate the transformation of the trees and perennials that come into bloom, plus it is a natural seasons of birth and beginnings. We are transformed by what we see and then by what we do.

Wishing you and your loved ones the freedom and blessings of transformation and meaningful holiday this spring.

* The Term “The Divine” is used as a general term and the reader is invited to substitute their own best and theologically correct term whenever it is used. Given the many names for God or the higher power, this prevents misunderstandings.

Judy Rey Wasserman is the Founder and an Artist of Post Conceptual Art theory including the branch called UnGraven Image. Discover more at http://ungravenimage.com<br>

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<strong>Judy Rey Wasserman is an artist and the founder of Post Conceptual Art theory and also the branch known as UnGraven Image Art. Download a free copy click: <a href=”http://ungravenimage.com/images/ManifestoofPosConceptualUnGravenImageArt.pdf” target=”_blank”>Manifesto of Post Conceptual Art– A Painting’s Meaning is Inherent in its Stroke.</a> </strong>

<strong> <a href=”http://store.artofseeingthedivine.com” target=”_blank”>Check out the limited and open edition prints in the estore.</a> </strong>
<strong>Follow her on Twitter at <a href=”http://twitter.com/judyrey” target=”_blank”> @judyrey </a>.]</strong>

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